A Strange Tale Of Our Times Update

Why are these things still happening in 2018?

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I wrote about the strange goings-on at St Stephen’s in Newham here.

As I wrote at time, it mystifies me that in the days of #MeToo and Time’sUp why, when a successful female headteacher like Neena Lall is targeted by conservative ‘religious leaders,’ the self-proclaimed ‘progressives’ at the Guardian and the so-called BBC are not up in arms. And Lall is clearly of BAME background, so these arch-‘progressives’ should be doubly offended.

Any reader familiar with this blog will know that the previous paragraph was deeply ironic and that had the aforementioned denizens of Guardian Towers and Jimmy Savile House come to Lall’s support, I would have been genuinely astonished. The insane doctrine of ‘intersectionality’ means that no member of an allegedly victimised group can be held guilty of misogyny, let alone racism, simply because they are a member of ‘victim’ group. The foul ideology of intersectionality is deeply, horribly racist. What did not surprise me is the follow up story in yesterday’s (04/02/2018) Sunday Times – Ofsted Chief Amanda Spielman targeted by anti-semites in hijab row. Continue reading “A Strange Tale Of Our Times Update”

Credit Where Credit Is Due

The old adage is true

Sorry to return to the same topic in the same week (I do have other interests you know) but today I was sent a link to a documentary from the so-called BBC entitled Panorama: White Fright: Divided Britain. This deals with the Lancashire town of Blackburn ten years after the so-called BBC first made a programme about how the area was becoming divided along ethnic and religious grounds.

Anyone with even a passing acquaintance with this blog will know that I am not a fan of the corrupt denizens of Jimmy Savile House. Their shilling for the Establishment and the EU (how astonishing that the so-called BBC should be a fan of a bloated and incompetent bureaucracy!), nauseating identity politics and all-round Islamophilia are bad enough but the fact that it is funded by a highly regressive poll tax is enough to make one burst a blood vessel. But, credit where credit is due, in this case the cliché is right – even a broken clock is right twice a day. Although when dealing with the so-called BBC, once in a Blue Moon is more accurate. Continue reading “Credit Where Credit Is Due”

A Strange Tale Of Our Times

Why are these things still happening in 2018?

Religion is odd. Some religious people are very odd indeed. Such is our familiarity with the myths of the Abrahamic faith(s) that we sometimes fail to see just how odd they are. There are people (some as highly-educated as Pope Emeritus Benedict) who believe that a being who has existed forever suddenly and for no discernible reason decided to create the universe; according to some of this being’s more cretinous followers this ‘creation’ happened 6,000 years ago, after the domestication of the dog! Not only did this being ‘create’ the universe, he takes a detailed interest in its denizens and will quite happily condemn them to an eternity of torture for breaking one of his myriad of petty rules,  rules that make little sense unless one has knowledge of the violent and brutally misogynistic societies of ancient Israel and early medieval Arabia.

As I say, odd.

Odder yet is that in 2018 we are still bowing down before the demands of this mythical being’s most demented followers. Continue reading “A Strange Tale Of Our Times”

Is Religion Original Sin?

The moral bankruptcy of the Abrahamic faith(s)

We have so much to ‘thank’ religion for – holy wars and jihads, rampant misogyny and child rape spring to mind. Each of three Abrahamic delusions – three religions that are actually one, like the Trinity – has made its own special contribution to the sum of human misery. Judaism gave us an aggressively male deity with mad rules about food and menstruation, whilst Islam has given the world a fatalistic terror of those rules and suicide bombings. But Christianity has bequeathed us the revolting doctrine of ‘Original Sin,’ often associated with St Augustine, the Osama Bin Laden of the later Roman Empire (bored, rich playboy turned religious maniac). Original Sin is the insane belief that we are all responsible for the ‘sin’ of a mythical rib-woman eating a piece of fruit, egged on by a talking snake and need to be ‘saved’ by the brutal execution of a carpenter who is his own father. Yes, I am being facetious but isn’t this the essence of Christianity? However, I would contend that religion itself – especially in its various Abrahamic forms – is an original sin, not just in the disgusting behaviour of its adherents but in its fundamental doctrines. Continue reading “Is Religion Original Sin?”

I Like Stories Too

But the categories ‘fiction’ and ‘non-fiction’ exist for a reason

One of my favourite childhood memories of my late grandmother happened when I was about eight years old. My grandmother had been on holiday and when she returned she brought back presents for myself and my siblings. My present was a Ladybird book of Greek myths containing the stories of Theseus and the Minotaur and Perseus and the Gorgons. I read the book over and over again. I’m pretty sure it was one of the reasons I got into History – wanting to know more about the society that created such fantastic tales. What I never did however, even as a child, was get my ideas about morality from the legends of Classical Greece. The gods of Olympics and the heroes of these legends seem to behave in a pretty immoral, or rather amoral, fashion. All societies have produced stories about superhuman beings – those of the Norse are particularly good and the Viking view of heaven as an endless drinking party is definitely one I can relate to. The great misfortune of History is that a large number of people have been forced to live according to the primitive morality contained in the myths and legends of the Ancient Hebrews. Continue reading “I Like Stories Too”

In Defence Of Classical History 

Imagine a world untouched by Christianity.

I recently attended a three day history conference. Now I know that sounds like torture to a lot of people but I loved it. One of the highlights was a professor of ancient history giving a lecture comparing democracy in ancient Greece and modern Europe. In particular he drew parallels between the Brexit Referendum in 2016 and the Sicilian Expedition during the Peloponnesian War (431-404BC). Whatever your views of the referendum, it was an exercise in democracy on an very large scale. Over 33,000,000 people voted – 72% of registered voters and 65% of the voting age population. In Athens, the people’s assembly (demos) voted on all government business; it was a direct rather than a representative democracy. In 415BC, the demos voted enthusiastically in favour of a plan to conquer Sicily. The expedition was a disaster and the Athenians lost 200 ships and thousands of soldiers. Whether the Brexit vote turns into a disaster on the scale of Sicily is anyone’s guess (personally, I doubt it). The point I am trying to make is that studying Classical History helps us to understand the workings of democracy. People are people, demagogues are demagogues – although I would hesitate to compare Boris Johnson to Alcibiades because he would like it too much. Upper-class playboy with a penchant for rabble-rousing and swapping sides? Sounds familiar? Continue reading “In Defence Of Classical History “

The New Puritans

Religion is dying but the religious mindset lives on

“What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.” (Ecclesiastics 1:9)

In about 385AD, a group of black clad religious fanatics appeared from the Syrian desert to attack the temple of Athena in the city of Palmyra. Palmyra stood at the eastern edge of the Roman Empire and the larger-than-life statue of the goddess had been created in a workshop hundreds of miles away and transported with considerable difficulty and expense to create an oasis of Greco-Roman culture in the Syrian desert. The religious fanatics decapitated the statue, pushed it from its pedestal, cut off its arms and left it in the dirt before melting back into the desert.

In 2015, a group of black clad religious fanatics appeared from the Syrian desert to attack Palmyra. The statue of Athena, that had been carefully repaired by archaeologists, was again attacked. Once more she was decapitated, once more her arm was cut off.

These religious fanatics, separated by more than 1700 years of time, are united by their hatred of ‘idolatry,’ their ignorance and their worship of the Abrahamic god. Christianity is Islam and Islam is Christianity. Continue reading “The New Puritans”