Celebrity And Nepotism

Second generation of pointless freeloaders

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It is hard to avoid celebrity culture in 2017. Even if one has no interest in the meaningless antics of people whose only claim to fame is fame itself, a bizarre kind of cultural osmosis happens whereby one cannot help but be aware that Kim Kardashian has bought a new handbag or Angelica Jolie has added another kid to her menagerie. The airwaves are absolutely stuffed with witless reality TV shows and the radio station where I live reports the tedious goings-on from these programmes as if it were news. I understand that producers love this kind of garbage because it is cheap – point a camera at a bunch of egomaniacs and hope they will argue, fight or have sex, or perhaps all three. The most irritating recent development is that the offspring of people who weren’t (and aren’t) interesting are now becoming celebrities in their own right. Continue reading “Celebrity And Nepotism”

Is Anyone Else Bored of This? Update

She was dull and talentless even when alive

In my original post about the media frenzy that continues to surround the proto-Kardashian Diana Spencer, I made a comment that she was always in the Daily Express and the Daily Mail, two bottom-feeding UK newspapers. I did not expect the Guardian to jump on the bandwagon, publishing this pile of tosh from Jonathan Freedland, one of the most Establishment writers in that nest of Establishment shills. But the reason I’ve posted the link is because I would encourage people to read the comments at the bottom of the article to find out what the public really thinks about the ridiculous Spencer woman. But in one way I agree with Freedland – Spencer did help shape modern Britain, a place where talent and ability are secondary to narcissism and ubiquity. Oh, and by the way Freedland, some of us were embarrassed by the emotional incontinence that followed Spencer’s death at the time.

Is Anyone Else Bored Of This?

She was dull and talentless even when alive

Apparently we are living in a “second golden age of television.” It’s true that there is a great deal of choice these days – pay TV, Apple TV, numerous streaming services – and the choices available make the poll tax levied to fund the BBC even more anachronistic than it was when I was a child. It’s also true that there are a lot of great television shows; I’ve always loved The Simpsons and Game of Thrones is excellent – the sixth and seventh series (when did television series become “seasons”?) have been of a particularly high standard. But, let’s face it, most television channels are filled with absolute dross and reality TV seems to be taking over. Baking a cake on the telly, watching people doing DIY, putting a bunch of narcissists on an island and hoping they have sex – this is not my idea of entertainment. Reality TV has spawned whole legions of people who are simply famous for being famous. When scrolling through a news website the other day I saw an advertisement for the new series of Celebrity Big Brother – I recognised one of the contestants because he used to have a minor role in EastEnders. Apparently, it is enough to appear on one reality TV show to qualify as a “celebrity” for another show. This is a longwinded introduction to my real topic – the refusal of some elements of the UK media to allow the proto-Kardashian, the original talentless celebrity, famous for wearing clothes, to fade into well-deserved obscurity. I refer of course to Diana Spencer, erstwhile Princess of Wales. Continue reading “Is Anyone Else Bored Of This?”